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  • Stephanie O. Joy, Esq.

Benefits of Part-Time Jobs for SSD/SSI Recipients

Take-away: SSD beneficiaries who remain disabled but may be able and wishing to work a little bit, may want to consider looking into it. There are parameters within the SSA laws that must be followed to reduce risks and enjoy success, so do consult with an experienced attorney (or seek a level of no-cost information from the SSA itself).

The benefits of an available part-time job market are positives for the population as a whole, but particularly for disabled beneficiaries of Social Security Disability benefits, as well as non-beneficiary disabled people. Those benefits include:


  • SSD/Disabled people can enrich their lives, their families, and themselves, when they are able enough to work a limited part-time job while continuing to receive the full insurance benefits they earned over their lifetimes.[2]

  • The emotional benefits of working part-time such as getting out, earning a buck, making a difference, often to others and to small or large businesses, and to their own livelihood cannot be understated.[2]

  • SSD/Disabled people working part-time often make friends on the job, and enjoy seeing people in the public space. This often leads to a social life and extra-curricular activities some don’t otherwise have access to.

  • SSD/Disabled people working part time may naturally avoid many of the stresses that come with full-time work that envelopes most of a worker’s waking hours, leading to a more enjoyable working experience.[3]

  • SSD/Disabled people working part-time (and, of course, our seniors) can maintain their Medicare coverage throughout, and part-time work will pay for the Medicare premiums, co-pays and deductibles that can otherwise be overwhelming when on a fixed income.[4],[5],[6]

  • The use-it or lose-it axiom of our great grandparents shouldn’t be overlooked![7] A body and mind in motion, stays in motion, and allows for a greater well-being all the way around. This is applicable to all – disabled workers, seniors, and the younger-non-disabled folks who are able to work and they may want to consider doing so even if they are not in need of work income.

  • Not to be forgotten! SSI-Disabled people (as opposed to SSD) can also work, with some added parameters.[8] The benefits can include:

a) having more money each month to improve their day to day living. (Circle back to here for a future link to the article on the additional financial rules for SSI recipients that SSD recipients don’t deal with.)


b) gaining Social Security earnings credits they may have lacked that caused them to not be eligible for Social Security Disability. This part-time work, in a certain amount of time, when done properly, may gain an SSI-welfare recipient, earned insured status for Social Security Benefits![9] This may allow them to leave the ranks of SSI and move to Social Security Disability.


Take-away: SSD beneficiaries who remain disabled but may be able and wishing to work a little bit, may want to consider looking into it. There are parameters within the SSA laws that must be followed to reduce risks and enjoy success, so do consult with an experienced attorney (or seek a level of no-cost information from the SSA itself).


If working while receiving SSDI is a possibility, learn about your Trial Work Period.


[2] https://ncd.gov/publications/2007/oct2007 [3] https://www.investopedia.com/articles/professionals/102115/6-benefits-working-part-time-instead-full-time.asp [4] Generally, the Medicare premiums are subtracted from the Social Security Disability (or Retirement check), leaving most recipients with somewhat less than their gross amount. [5] https://medicareadvocacy.org/medicare-info/medicare-coverage-for-people-with-disabilities/ [6] https://www.medicare.gov/ [7] https://www.todaysgeriatricmedicine.com/archive/MJ16p5.shtml [8] https://www.ssa.gov/ssi/text-work-ussi.htm [9] https://soarworks.samhsa.gov/faq/if-someone-already-receives-ssi-it-possible-they-might-qualify-ssdi-instead-it-worth-pursuing



For SSD/SSI representation consideration, please fill out our free Attorney Evaluation form. We do not charge a retainer to serve you. If, on the other hand, you (company, publisher, individual) seek an attorney level consultation/analysis of a particular situation, without representation, to learn information beyond that information you may obtain for free from the SSA itself, and you do not otherwise have a professional representing you before the SSA, you may order a scheduled consultation at affordable attorney rates. Contact the office at 201-317-0610 or email stephaniejoy@joydisability.com.



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